vrijdag 8 juli 2016

Cambodia Photography Mekong River 5 day photo safari~adventure with photographer Michael Klinkhamer.



Cambodia Photography Mekong River photography safari~adventure with photographer Michael Klinkhamer.

Program;

Photography Adventure 5 days/4 nights $550,-(3 days/2 nights is optional)
Including all workshops and guidance.
Additional lectures and inspirational photo presentations.
Your personal pictures reviews and evaluations of the photo work in progress.
All Transport (AC minivan or tuk-tuk).
4 night accommodation and breakfast.
Entrance fees and dolphin watching boat fees.
Boat hire on the Mekong.




Available Dates:
August 6th to 10th, August 2016.
August 20th to 24th August 2016.
September 10th to 14th September 2016.
September 24th to 28th  September 2016.
October 8th to 12th October 2016.
October 22th to 26th October 2016.
November 5th to 9th November 2016.
November 19th to 23th November 2016.
December 3th to 7th December 2016.
December 17th to 21th December 2016.
January 7th 11th January 2017.
January 21th to 25th January 2017.
February 4th to 8th February 2017.
February 18th to 22th February 2017.
March 4th to 8th March 2017.

For bookings or more information contact me: info@cambodiaphototours.asia  or fill out the booking page at http://www.cambodiaphototours.asia
https://www.facebook.com/cambodiaphototours/
Or call: +85560873847 Skype: klinkfoto (Michael Klinkhamer)

This exciting, safe and well cared for photography tour-workshop with professional photographer and Cambodia expert Michael Klinkhamer is now available for a 5-day Mekong River adventure which will offer a true photographic exploration and further discovery of the real Cambodia it’s culture, landscape and it’s people.
Immerge with like minded people into a couple of days of intense photography and learning and exploration along one of the most powerful rivers of all time, the mighty Mekong.
Small group max 6-8people.


 Our Itinerary:

*Day1. Full day Phnom Penh Photo Tour. Photography the city from the perspective of and insider and get off the beaten track during this highly reviewed phototour. We first start with getting the basics and get the best settings for your camera on street photography and how to do portraits and mingle with the locals. We visit a selection of hidden locations that no tour book will show you and find interesting architecture and the famous ‘white building” and then visit a local Cham fishing village and a slum nested on the borders of the Mekong river.




*Day2.Morning meeting and review of the Phnom Penh Photo tour, we visit a Cham fishing village on the Mekong near Phnom Penh and travel from Phnom Penh to the town of  Kampong Cham on the Mekong river and discover with our camera the amazing seasonable Bamboo bridge structure, local market and relax with a cool beer and some good food and overnight along the mighty Mekong river at our hotel.


Kratie. A room with a view ©MK




*Day3. Morning sunrise photography session along the Mekong river and onwards travel to the sleepy town of Kratie on the Mekong river. We explore the tranquil Kao Trong Island and beaches in the Mekong river for some natural and local living photography and further exploration on foot and bicycle and you can enjoy a rewarding and cooling swim in the clean Mekong river. Kao Trong It's one of those semi-timeless Cambodian destinations. filled with sugar palms, paddy rice fields and plenty of pretty Khmer -style wooden houses, it's a delight to either ride or walk around the 9 kilometer circuit circling the Island. At the southern tip of the island, you'll will find a small Vietnamese pagoda and on the southwest bank a small floating village. Get in touch with nature and yourself. Overnight we stay on Kao Trong at a traditional build guest house and enjoy the silence, since there are almost no cars. 

on Kao Trong Island ©MK.

on Kao Trong floating village. 
*Day4.Exploration along the Mekong river as we watch/photograph the endangered Irrawaddy dolphins on a small boat in the middle of the river. This is an amazing moment when you can hear the dolphins breathe and watch them swim against the fast flow of the Mekong
This is a challenging assignment for the Dolphins only surface for a moment and it’s hard to predict where? Get your telephoto lens ready!
The proposed and finished Hydro dams in the upper Mekong are a real treat to the biodiversity of the Mekong. There are only around 80 dolphins left and if the hydro dams will be completed it is almost certain the dolphins will be extinct together with the abundance of other fish and fish migration. We will discuss these issues during our post production and image review evening meetings.
We continue our exploration along the river as we will settle down for lunch at the Kampi rapids, where many small islands and some elevation makes the river run really fast.
After lunch and some time to relax we continue to the village of Sambour where we will hire a boat to explore the river and meet up with locals fishing and making a living off the river. The vast and wide river has many islands and hidden treasures to offer. We will be spending sufficient time on the Mekong River and are able to get up close to the local living and ancient culture.

 Endangered Irrawaddy Dolphin ©MK.

 Irrawaddy dolphin boat landing and great view over the Mekong ©MK.
Take it easy ©MK

Traditional fishing life on the Mekong ©MK



A little south of the dolphins is a hilltop pagoda that offers great views over the surrounds and there is also some great mural art. This is a great sunset spot.
After the sunset we drive back to Kratie for the night, have a nice dinner and a glass of beer or red wine and dream of dolphins at our comfortable Kratie town based hotel.

**Day5. Return ride by VIP minivan to Phnom Penh.                                                              (Alternative it is possible to continue your Cambodian exploration by going further up the Mekong River towards Stung Treng or head from Kratie toward north eastern Cambodian Mondulkiri and the town of Monorom.)

What’s Included:
Photography workshops and guidance.
Additional lectures and inspirational photo presentations.
Personal picture reviews and evaluations of the photo work in progress.
Transport (AC minivan or tuk-tuk).
4 night accommodation and breakfast.
Entrance fees and dolphin watching boat fees.
Boat hire on the Mekong.


What's Excluded:
Travel into and from Cambodia, we meet in Phnom Penh.
Personal travel insurance and photographic gear Insurance.
Drinks and meals, except breakfast.
Personal expenses, like laundry, gifts, travel expenses outside the workshop.

For bookings or more information contact me: info@cambodiaphototours.asia  or fill out the booking page at http://www.cambodiaphototours.asia
Or call: +85560873847 Skype: klinkfoto (Michael Klinkhamer)


About Michael Klinkhamer:

Tour leader and professional photographer Michael Klinkhamer (56 years) lives in Cambodia since 2011 and is from Amsterdam-Holland. “I feel almost like a local by now.
My professional background in photography is close to 30 years and very diverse.     I started out as a portrait/sports/aerial/newspaper and magazine photographer and took on advertising and automotive (cars) for numerous magazine publications and worked for prestigious clients in and outside the studio. In 2008, I made the switch to publishing editorial productions of pictures and words for magazines and focused on articles about travel, interviews about art and architecture as well as exhibiting my work of fine art photography. “




Over the last 3 years I held three photo exhibitions in Phnom Penh galleries and run an intimate phototour company in Cambodia. This Phnom Penh phototour generates a lot of good reviews and happy photographers who are getting the best out of their time and learn how to approach each photograph with the essential task to make it speak for itself, learning to do portraits of locals and training the eye for the hidden treasures we sometimes overlook. As I learnt a lot from my peers in the photography business, it is now my time to share all the experience and know how in film and digital photography with you, and keep learning as well. Photography is never finished ~~MK~2016.


donderdag 30 juni 2016

Phnom Penh Noir

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©


At the heart of "noir street photography" may be wretchedness and misery, but even a very dark image is not devoid of beauty, energy and has a powerful beating heart.

The recent history of Cambodia is dark but it's resilient people are a tribute to life and the positive energy of its youth. Here I show the contrast and graphic elements and focus on the profound hard life and the soft hearted people of Phnom Penh.

These Images have been found in the streets of Phnom Penh-Cambodia between 2012 and 2016.
Michael Klinkhamer (Amsterdam 1959) Lives and works in South East Asia and has made Phnom Penh his home.



Contact: michael@michaelklinkhamer.com 
info@cambodiaphototours.asia
+85560873847







Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©
Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©
Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©


Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©
Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©
Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©


Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©

Phnom Penh Noir~by Michael Klinkhamer ©







donderdag 2 juni 2016

Save the Mekong, River of Life.

Photo Essay Project by Michael Klinkhamer.

Shared by six countries — Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Thailand, China and Myanmar (Burma) — the Mekong region is rich in resources, culturally diverse and home to what the people of the region call their ‘life blood’; the mighty Mekong River is now seriously under threat by proposed and already build hydro dams in the upper and lower sections of the river.
My aim is to photograph the lives of the people affected as it is now, of those people  living unaware and in uncertainty for their future on the brink of a change in their centuries old lifestyles that will impact them now as well as future generations of people depending on the Mekong river in Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam. Country and village cultures, many who depend on fishing and small-scale aquaculture are likely to be shoved into the cash economy without the capital or knowledge they need to survive in it.
My approach will be documentary, photojournalistic, fine art portraits and landscape work including video/film productions. For more information, sponsorship or usage of images contact Michael Klinkhamer Photography, resident in Cambodia-Phnom Penh. klinkhamerphoto@gmail.com
This mainly photographic essay, exhibition and book is because of it's complexity and sheer size of the Mekong river (4,350 km) a project in progress. Over time I will make expeditions and photo treks towards the communities near and close to the main proposed hydropower dams and aim my camera lens on the people living in the region mostly depending on the (fish, farming, gathering resources of the Mekong river, and mostly still living in an ancient local agricultural way. When the hydro dams are completed and their livelihood has been gradually taken away or changed dramatically, this deep rooted exchange with nature and the wild river will be lost forever together with the biodiversity and endangered river animal river species, like the Irrawaddy dolphins swimming near Kratie in Cambodia will be extinct.
The reward of the exploitations of the Mekong will benefit the economic powers and supply energy for the city's in Thailand and China. Close to nothing will be gained for the local communities.  
It is clear that the free-flowing Mekong is a vital resource for poor and vulnerable people in the lower Mekong region, with its abundant resources including essential water for agriculture and fisheries. The health of this system is crucial to the future security of the women, men and children who depend on the Mekong, and to the economic development of the countries within the Mekong region. How to reverse this horror and doom scenario? By raising awareness, education, cooperation and making sustainable alternatives like wind and solar power options a real alternative.

Read more: https://www.internationalrivers.org/node/10852 
Traditional infrastructure are today still in full practice along the Mekong river. (Bamboo Bridge near Kampong Cham in Cambodia.  

As the modern infrastructure and road connection are being completed the national economy is boosted, but the local people have a hard time adapting. Local floating village near Kampong Cham in Cambodia. 
Woman empowerment is vital for the transition from traditional lives to the modern economies and new challenges in order to deal with the changes along the Mekong river delta.

Youth education and a stop to child labour are challenging for the traditional lives in local communities along the Mekong river   

Youth education and a stop to child labour are challenging for the traditional lives in local communities along the Mekong river  (2)

People depending on the Mekong may be included at the last minute when they're forced to resettle or to adapt to new situations where their land or waters have been taken away, or fundamentally changed.

Floating villages on the Mekong river provide food and income in fisheries but also provide a nomadic life of many generations where people are independent and self reliant. This will probably change when dams change the bio-diversity.  

Threats to the region

Land grabs, damming, deforestation, and exploitation of resources – including  mining– all threaten to push the Mekong’s most vulnerable communities further into poverty. Plans to build 12 hydropower dams on the river’s main stream present some of the region’s most pressing concerns.
The Mekong is home to the world’s largest freshwater fishery, and is the second-most biodiverse river on the planet – with 1,200 native fish species, and new species discovered every year. The river is a crucial source of food and income for local communities.
If the dams proceed they will alter the delicate ecosystem of the river and its surrounds, preventing fish from reaching their breeding grounds during annual migrations and threatening their long-term survival.
Many fishing communities will be forced to resettle if fish stocks disappear, creating further hardship for people already struggling with extreme poverty. Life is particularly difficult for ethnic minorities and populations in border areas, who have experienced far fewer benefits of the region’s economic growth. Many households are still at subsistence level, and must fish and forage for wild foods to survive.
Today Southeast Asia is now relatively peaceful after decades of war, and for the most part, it's economies are humming and change of lives and customs and traditions are following rapidly from the traditional ways of life into the cash economy.

The muddy water and shifting currents of the Tonle Sap form a natural fish factory, nurturing finger-length silverfish, 650-pound catfish, and hundreds of species in between. 
By disrupting fish migration and spawning, the new dams are expected to threaten the food supply of an estimated 60 million people—most of whom live in villages.
Home to 781 known species, the Mekong River is the second-largest fish biodiversity region, with about half the entire river being classified as a Key Biodiversity Area
By altering the river structure and flow, the 12 proposed hydro power dams would affect 80% of the Key Biodiversity Area and put more than 100 species at risk. The extinction of some species unique to the Mekong such as the Irrawaddy Dolphin and the Giant Mekong Catfish, would be highly likely. 
By changing traditional lifestyles forever, the dams could lead to growing inequality and short to mid term poverty while undermining region-wide efforts to meet national poverty alleviation goals.

Young woman setting up a fish trap in the Mekong river. Will the young generation find a future in the traditional means of supporting their family's or will they be pushed into the cash economy in the big cities? 
Internet and mobile connection is changing the lives in remote parts of the Mekong delta. Information and social media is now on everybody's fingertips, raising awareness and new opportunities.

Will minorities and woman find a way into the cash economy as the food resources and their nomadic lives will be harder to survive in ?